Tag: Dogs


By Paul Tan (Owner of Bailey the Golden)

When our dog gets older, we need to start looking at their dietary needs and understand that they are not as active and agile as before. Larger breeds age faster than smaller dogs. Overweight dogs also age faster than leaner dogs. Dogs are considered older when they have reached half of their life expectancy. In general, with good diet, supplements and knowledge, smaller dogs live to about 15 to 20 years and bigger dogs live to about 12 to 15 years. So bigger dogs are considered older when they reach about 6 years of age and smaller ones at 8 or 9 years. For senior dogs, we need to focus more on a low-calorie diet to prevent obesity. With lower activity levels and slower metabolic rate, older dogs are more likely to put on weight. Let’s look at foods that are beneficial for senior dogs.

Berries

Antioxidants help to fight cancer and they can be found in berries such as blueberries, blackberries, raspberries and strawberries. They are also a good source of fibre. Bailey loves his berries.

Broccoli

Vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and brussels sprouts are great antioxidants and contain other nutrients that might help prevent cancer. These vegetables need to be well-cooked before feeding because raw forms can suppress thyroid function if your dog is fed excess amounts. I generally do not feed Bailey a quantity more than 10% of his diet if these vegetables are added to his diet.

Eggs

Eggs are a great source of protein for your dogs. Hard-boiled eggs where the yolks are cooked, are best. Do not feed more than two eggs a day to a large dog, one egg to a medium and half an egg to dogs less than 13kg.

Fish

Fish that are high in omega-3 oils are a healthy option for your pet as it supports the immunity system, reduces inflammation and is great for their skin and coat.

Liver

Liver is packed with vitamins and trace minerals so it is exceptionally nutrient-dense. However, feed small amounts only – not more than 5% of total diet – otherwise it can lead to loose stool.

Red meat

Red meats like beef and lamb provide iron, zinc and other nutrients. Feeding a mix of poultry and red meats gives a good variety of fatty acids. It’s better to drain the fats after cooking.

Sweet Potatoes

Packed with beta-carotene as found in other yellow-orange vegetables, they are an excellent source of vitamin C and antioxidants. Be sure to cook them before feeding.

Yoghurt

Probiotics in yoghurt contain good bacteria that can help with a dog’s digestive system. A spoonful of non-fat or low fat yoghurt added to each meal would help maintain a healthy gut. A key point to note, do not add pre/probiotics or yoghurt to your dog’s food when it’s still hot as this will kill the good bacteria.

 

About the author:

Paul Tan is the owner of Bailey the Golden, our brand ambassador. Bailey started training for canine obedience competitions when he was 7 months old. He has appeared in several TV appearances, including a commercial with famed dog whisperer, Cesar Millan. Bailey is currently taking Astamate as part of his supplement diet. You may follow Bailey on Instagram: Bailey the Golden.

Photo by Anoir Chafik on Unsplash

By Paul Tan (Owner of Bailey the Golden)

When you want to get a pet dog for your home, there are a number of things on a checklist that you probably need to go through (hyperlink to Getting a Dog: Does Reality Bite?).  Once you’ve sorted that out, the next thing to consider is whether to buy or adopt. There are pros and cons to each option, but let’s not go into that today. In this article I want to highlight the factors to consider when adopting your new friend. By using both your emotions and rationale in a systematic thought process, you will more likely to end up with a great match. Let’s take a look at the considerations:

Health condition

Questions to ask: Is the dog healthy? Any pre-existing health problems? Any special dietary needs or allergies? Are you able to physically handle them?  It’s ok to pass up on a dog with medical issues since there will be more financial and emotional commitments required of the owner and not everyone can handle it. However, if you are up for it in spite of these needs, then go for it. I have seen Bailey’s therapy dog colleague, a three-legged furkid who is a great and loving companion, make an amazing pet!

Lifestyle

Ask yourself if you want an active dog or a lap dog. Getting the right type of dog based on the right energy level will make a good match. At the shelter, take the dog for a walk. Check for his energy level. Is he all over the place, or does he walk calmly beside you, or perhaps he walks for a bit then lies down and refuses to walk further? How does the dog respond to games and play? This is the stage when you can ask yourself thought-provoking questions about the lifestyle fit between the dog and you, and also clarify some of these queries with the shelter folks.

Sociable with people

This is one of the most relevant factors you need to assess. The dog you are considering should be people-friendly, outgoing and loves your attention. Shelters are usually stressful for dogs. Try to bring the dog to a quiet corner of the shelter. Ask to be alone with the dog and watch how the dog reacts. Look out for the following: does he seek your attention and love to be pat by you, maybe he just wants to smell but also gives you some attention when you pat him, or does he ignore you and doesn’t make eye contact.  If it is the former, the dog enjoys the company of people, if it is the latter, it’s going to be a lot of work. The latter dog could be afraid of humans and this fear can lead to aggression, sometimes even cause it to bite. Having said that, getting help from a behaviourist trainer will turn it around but be prepared for it to take effort and time.

Social skills with other dogs

Does the dog get along with other dogs? Does he get along with dogs of all sizes? Ask the shelter for the answers. If he is terrified, he won’t want to make new friends. If the dog has had a bad prior experience like being attacked by another dog, it will take a lot of effort to work him to trust others again.

With the above considerations, you should be able to make some good decisions. If this does not work out, don’t lose hope. Don’t let your heart rule your head. Be patient, and you will eventually find the right match.

 

About the author:

Paul Tan is the owner of Bailey the Golden, our brand ambassador. Bailey started training for canine obedience competitions when he was 7 months old. He has appeared in several TV appearances, including a commercial with famed dog whisperer, Cesar Millan. Bailey is currently taking Astamate as part of his supplement diet. You may follow Bailey on Instagram: Bailey the Golden.

By Paul Tan (Owner of Bailey the Golden)

Why does your dog follow you around?

Do you find your dog following you around? It’s adorable, isn’t it? The reason for this is simply because it is a dog’s instinct to always do things with the family they are with.

Going all hyped up when I return home

The moment Bailey hears the gate or door and realises it’s me, he goes all happy and brings me his toys or my shoes, his tail wagging profusely as he greets me at the door. When he gets into the house, he would run and jump onto the sofa to get me the cushion too. These enthusiastic gestures are his simple way of saying he misses me! It’s not only a warm welcome but also an equally wonderful feeling for us.

Bringing you gifts

Each time I am done with a task at home, Bailey will bring me slippers, toys or my sneakers. This is his way of showing his excitement that I can now spend some time with him. Dogs do this as they basically want to share their joy at that moment in time.

High five

Bailey has learnt to high five, which to him is raising one of his paws. It usually means he is in the mood for some playtime or he wants a snack. Recently, he has learnt to say “please…” by sitting on his hind legs and with his two front paws resting on your thighs.

Kissing or licking your face

Whenever I ask Bailey: “Who do you love?” Bailey will lean over and give me a couple of licks. Giving licks is actually submissive behaviour and even helps to ease their stress. It is also definitely a sign of love!

Getting onto the bed

It was only recently, after 4 years of not allowing him into the bedroom, that we allowed Bailey onto our bed. This loyal dog loves to keep close and cuddle up with mama especially. He probably feels more comfortable spending the night with us and is sensible enough to not intrude into our space as well. No one loves bedtime as much as him!

Body contact

Bailey is really quite an affectionate dog. If he likes you, which he will most of the time, he will not be afraid of physical contact, even if you are a stranger. At home, he would keep me company while we are watching television and he would tend to lean his body against me. It basically means he is looking for some extra affection and hugs. Dogs love the feel of touch and it communicates to him how much you love them.

 

About the author:

Paul Tan is the owner of Bailey the Golden, our brand ambassador. Bailey started training for canine obedience competitions when he was 7 months old. He has appeared in several TV appearances, including a commercial with famed dog whisperer, Cesar Millan. Bailey is currently taking Astamate as part of his supplement diet. You may follow Bailey on Instagram: Bailey the Golden.

 

By Paul Tan (Owner of Bailey the Golden)

Dogs do have feelings and more often than not, we unknowingly do things that may annoy our furkids.

Here are some of the classics:

HUGS

Typically, dogs get annoyed when being hugged tightly, especially by strangers or children. Unless your dog enjoys being hugged, it’s best to tell friends and family to stick to gentle patting instead.

TEASING

Dogs are like humans and don’t like to be teased. Pulling their tails or ears, moving their food dish while he eats, making a dog chase after a laser pointer can drive a dog crazy. So stay away from such activities.

TOO MUCH ALONE TIME

Dogs are social animals and once they come into the lives of your family, they become part of the pack. Leaving a dog on its own for long hours can create behavioural issues like separation anxiety, excessive barking or destructive behaviour. We always make sure Bailey gets his walks daily regardless of how busy we are. We must treasure the time we spend together and the bond our dog has with us. After all, they will only be with us for less than a quarter of our lifetime.

STARING

Dogs, like us humans, hate to be stared at. To a dog, a stare is seen as a challenge. So never stare into the eyes of an edgy or aggressive dog if you do not want to aggravate a tense situation.

YELLING

When you yell, it is interpreted as angry barking to your dog. Ever notice that when your dog barks, and you shout for him to quieten down from a distance, he just keeps on barking? Always use a deep tone to command your dog to stop his bad or unwanted behaviour. Adjusting your tone works better than volume.

OVERLY ENTHUSIASTIC GREETING

We often encounter people do not know how to properly greet a dog. At times, these folks want to pat Bailey and are overly enthusiastic in their approach, which causes Bailey to react by barking at them.  Some will stare or move their hands unexpectedly towards him to touch him. This usually threatens a dog since they are unfamiliar with you and are not sure what you want to do.

The best way to greet a dog is to greet the owner first instead. During this time, the dog will sniff you and will feel more comfortable after. If the dog seems at ease, ask the owner for permission before patting the dog.

 

About the author:

Paul Tan is the owner of Bailey the Golden, our brand ambassador. Bailey started training for canine obedience competitions when he was 7 months old. He has appeared in several TV appearances, including a commercial with famed dog whisperer, Cesar Millan. Bailey is currently taking Astamate as part of his supplement diet. You may follow Bailey on Instagram: Bailey the Golden.

By Paul Tan (Owner of Bailey the Golden)

Dogs of all sizes need exercise daily.  Exercise is based on a dog’s age, breed, size and their health conditions.  On average you should exercise your dog a total of half hour minimally daily.  Brisk walks, jogging, swimming or incorporate with play games like fetch etc.  Breeds like labradors, retrievers and collies require more exercise as they are hunting dogs by nature.

Weather conditions are important consideration for all dogs’ activity.  Dogs can get heat stroke as well.  In our weather, making sure your dog has ample amount of water during and after exercise.

Mental exercise is good to stimulate and keep your dog alert.  Food toys like Kong is excellent for your dog to figure out how to get to his food.  If your hunting dogs are scent driven, you can hide treats around the house and let him hunt for them.  Just sit back and watch the fun!

Dogs, like their humans, enjoy both familiarity and a little variety in their exercise routines.  Most dogs get the chance to become familiar with their neighbourhood during walks and even the humans.  Dog parks are a good space to go off leash for your dog to play and explore freely.  At such spaces is where your dogs get to mingle and be socially friendly with other dogs.  However, there are always exception to other reactive dogs at the playground, so always keep an eye on your dog when he is off leash.   Day care for dogs is another place where they get to exercise and play with fellow canines.  Looking for a reliable one will be the key consideration.

Inactive dogs usually end up overweight, and getting into health problems as they age.  Being overweight brings the risk of health issues like diabetes, joint problems and heart diseases.  Bigger dogs run the risk of hip dysplasia, arthritis and other joint problems.  Being overweight add stress to the joints and ligaments.

So remember to give your dog the exercise they need. A healthy and happy dog makes them a great companion.

 

About the author:

Paul Tan is the owner of Bailey the Golden, our brand ambassador. Bailey started training for canine obedience competitions when he was 7 months old. He has appeared in several TV appearances, including a commercial with famed dog whisperer, Cesar Millan. Bailey is currently taking Astamate as part of his supplement diet. You may follow Bailey on Instagram: Bailey the Golden.

By Paul Tan (Owner of Bailey the Golden)

Closely related to your dog’s diet are the types and amounts of supplements he is getting: these aid in proper bodily functions such as a well-regulated digestive system and optimal muscle growth. Vitamin deficiencies can sometimes cause serious health problems and adverse long-term effects.

A growing puppy requires a special diet to complement its physical development – research and advice from the vet or knowledgeable friends will point you to reputable pet foods that provide high quality ingredients necessary for your dog’s well-balanced meals. Bailey was on kibbles during his puppyhood as we were not experienced in a dog’s nutrition then. We started to prepare home-cooked food for Bailey so that we’d have a better control of his diet, with the assurance that it is preservative-free. We also learnt to pair it with the necessary supplements for his wellbeing.

Most pet owners only start giving vitamins or supplements when their pets are diagnosed with a deficiency, or as part of a treatment requirement. Bailey’s case came about as we recognised he would need a good multivitamin to supplement the nutrients that his home-cooked meals might not adequately meet. Our research on the digestive system also alerted us to the weakening of a dog’s stomach walls and lining whenever it is put on a course of antibiotics or steroids, which in turn affects the dog’s absorption of nutrients. Hence, the search for an effective pre- and probiotic was one of our priorities for Bailey. Probiotics are not only great for a dog’s digestive system but also handy when he has an upset tummy. We’d double-dose the probiotics and the good bacteria sorts the problem out every time.

The next supplement we added to Bailey’s daily diet is Rose-Hip powder. Rose-Hip is an all-natural, plant-based anti-inflammatory and immune system support for treating inflammation, maintaining healthy joints, supplementing nutrition and improving performance. Bailey is an active dog and a supplement like Rose-Hip helps him maintain healthy joints!

The last stop for our research is an antioxidant for Bailey, one that would counter the effects of damaging free radicals in the body. Free radicals, a natural by-product of metabolism and produced in greater amounts when one is sick, elderly, exposed to toxins, or suffer from poor nutrition, attack and take electrons from cell membranes, proteins and DNA. The molecule that loses an electron to a free radical often becomes a free radical itself, continuing the cycle. Here’s where antioxidants come in: they donate electrons to free radicals without becoming free radicals themselves, thus breaking the cycle of molecular and cellular damage. Hence with sufficient antioxidants, our furkids can maintain a strong immune system throughout its life and age in a healthy manner. That’s when we found Astamate, a premium supplement that contains the super antioxidant, Astaxanthin. Within several weeks of consuming Astamate, Bailey’s coat has improved tremendously and those who know him immediately see the difference.

So, when you start looking for supplements for your furkid, look out for what is missing and what is needed. Bailey is a healthy dog and we wanted the right supplements as a preventive measure to maintain his wellbeing. A healthy dog is a happy dog!

 

About the author:

Paul Tan is the owner of Bailey the Golden, our brand ambassador. Bailey started training for canine obedience competitions when he was 7 months old. He has appeared in several TV appearances, including a commercial with famed dog whisperer, Cesar Millan. Bailey is currently taking Astamate as part of his supplement diet. You may follow Bailey on Instagram: Bailey the Golden.

By Paul Tan (Owner of Bailey the Golden)

Here is a list of fun facts about dogs. Feel free to share if you have new insight to man’s best friend!

1) A guy with a dog is three times more likely to get a lady’s phone number (this is not why I got Bailey, by the way!).

2) Dogs have wet noses because it helps to absorb scent chemicals.

3) Dogs only have sweat glands in their paws.

4) Your dog’s sense of smell is 1,000 to 10 million times better than yours (its keenness is breed-dependent).

5) Dogs can hear four times as far as humans.

6) When dogs poop, they prefer to do it in alignment with the Earth’s magnetic field. That’s why they keep turning to find the right direction before getting down to business…

7) Dogs not only see in black and white but also blue, yellow and various shades of grey.

8) Dogs can be trained to be diabetic alert dogs: they will pick up on the special scent that is released when their human’s insulin level drops.

9) Dogs curl up because they have an instinct to keep themselves warm and to protect their vital organs while they sleep.

10) Leave a piece of your clothing (unwashed) with your dog and this comforting scent will help curb your dog’s separation anxiety.

11) A puppy has 28 teeth and normal adult dogs have 42.

12) Dog’s eyes contain a special membrane called tapetum lucidum, which allows them to see in the dark.

13) The fastest breed, the Greyhound, can run up to 70 kilometres/hour.

14) The average lifespan of a dog is 10 to 14 years.

15) Smaller dogs tend to live longer than those of a larger breed.

16) The Chihuahua, at about 6 inches, is the shortest breed, and also one of the smallest in the world.

17) Dogs who bark the most: Miniature Schnauzers, Fox Terriers, West Highland White Terriers and Yorkshire Terriers.

18) The best time to bring a puppy home is when it’s between 8 and 12 weeks old.

19) Highly trainable dog breeds are Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, German Shepherds and Collies.

20) If you have allergies, Bichons, Poodles, Maltese and Kerry Blue Terriers are good choices since they shed less than other breeds.

21) The average number of puppies in a litter is four to six.

22) Dogs are pack animals, they don’t enjoy being alone.

23) Dogs who have been spayed or neutered live longer than intact dogs.

24) Your dog can smell your feelings, so remember to tell him you love him!

 

About the author:

Paul Tan is the owner of Bailey the Golden, our brand ambassador. Bailey started training for canine obedience competitions when he was 7 months old. He has appeared in several TV appearances, including a commercial with famed dog whisperer, Cesar Millan. Bailey is currently taking Astamate as part of his supplement diet. You may follow Bailey on Instagram: Bailey the Golden.

By Paul Tan (Owner of Bailey the Golden)

Humans respond to verbal and non-verbal communication, so do dogs. Hence, it is important to observe your body language to ensure you are sending the intended message to your dog, as much as he does when communicating with you using non-verbal cues. Of course, there are times when our body language ends up misrepresenting our intentions; here is one that happens frequently: when people see an adorable-looking dog, most would naturally reach out their hands to touch or pat the dog’s head. What we don’t realise is that by doing so, you could unwittingly be intimidating the dog. While most dogs don’t mind it (some love it!), the more sensitive or fearful ones could be frightened by your gesture.

Your body language is a major component of day-to-day interactions, and even more so during training as it determines how your dog responds to you. For instance, if you call your dog to come to you, he may trot over slowly and sit at a distance. But by changing your stance – bending your knees and crouching down to call him – he will likely come over enthusiastically because your lowered body looks less intimidating to him.

Dogs are very perceptive and will notice even the slightest changes in your demeanour, be it the tone of voice, a clenched fist, stiffening of the body in moments of anger or frustration… Your dog may be less responsive when he senses that you are upset. Oftentimes, this creates a vicious cycle where the dog starts running around or acting silly to try to reduce the tension. This in turn makes you more tensed, resulting in a frustrating training session for all.

One more point to highlight: Staring into the eyes of a dog intently is considered a very assertive gesture, and is perceived as a sign of challenge to a dog. While this is not something that we would generally do, children do like to get close to a dog’s face and, as a display of affection, stare into its eyes. What one dog allows, another may not, so be forewarned and don’t let a child get too close to a dog that is less tolerant as it could prove to be more dangerous than we perceive.

Once your dog is in tune with your body language, it becomes easier to teach them sign language as well. I taught my previous Golden, Triever, sign language as I knew this would be a useful form of communication should he become deaf in his old age. True enough, it came in handy and despite the loss of hearing, I could keep communicating with Triever. Bailey is being taught sign language as part of our on-going training. In fact, it is easier to teach dogs hand signals or other physical cues than for them to understand verbal cues. Just remember my number one rule for training: be consistent in the hand signals used.

 

About the author:

Paul Tan is the owner of Bailey the Golden, our brand ambassador. Bailey started training for canine obedience competitions when he was 7 months old. He has appeared in several TV appearances, including a commercial with famed dog whisperer, Cesar Millan. Bailey is currently taking Astamate as part of his supplement diet. You may follow Bailey on Instagram: Bailey the Golden.

By Paul Tan (Owner of Bailey the Golden)

When Bailey turned one, we stopped feeding him kibbles and started giving him home-cooked meals. I knew that what we were preparing for Bailey would not be adequate in providing the full spectrum of vitamins and nutrition that he would need, so we searched for the necessary supplements that would cover Bailey’s requirements to ensure his overall well-being. What has worked for us is: along with his daily intake of fresh, home-cooked food, we enhance it with salmon oil, multivitamins, rosehip powder, pre- and probiotics. We are also constantly on the lookout for quality supplements that will boost Bailey’s health and do more for his overall well-being. The key point in being healthy –this is as true for us as it is for our furkids – is not to wait till you face a health crisis but, rather, to adopt a preventive stance by keeping healthy with the consumption of the right nutrients and supplements, alongside an active physical and mental lifestyle.

Earlier this year, we were very fortunate to be introduced to astaxanthin through the good folks of Astavita. Astavita’s pet supplement, Astamate, is formulated with high quality, natural astaxanthin for the maintenance of your pet’s health. We took a bag of Astamate samples home and I started researching on the benefits of astaxanthin, as well as its side effects; this is my own protocol before I decide whether or not to introduce a new item to Bailey’s diet.

These are what I found from my research on astaxanthin:

  • A powerful antioxidant that is up to 6,000 times more potent than Vitamin C
  • It aids humans in improving their cardiovascular health, high cholesterol, chances of stroke, age-related cognitive impairment, metabolic syndrome and an eye condition known as macular degeneration
  • In dogs and cats, astaxanthin can be applied as a nutraceutical supplement for autoimmune disease, arthritis, allergies, cardiovascular health, metabolic syndrome, cognitive dysfunction, and many other conditions that result in inflammation and tissue damage from free radical formation
  • And if given in proper doses, there are virtually no negative side effects

WOW!! Did I just chance upon a miracle antioxidant? From what I have read, the efficacy of astaxanthin is attested article after article, and naturally, it is a supplement I wanted Bailey to try… so we started him on Astamate.

We started telling his friends about Astamate and gave them sample packs. After a period of trial use, we received some positive feedback, particularly from dogs with existing health problems: one had skin problems but fully recovered after a week’s dose. Another golden retriever had a heart murmur issue and after two months’ of Astamate, his blood pressure stabilised and his condition was back to normal! As for Bailey, he is a pretty heathy dog and hence the changes were not so visible. It only dawned on us during Bailey’s home grooming session when his groomer remarked, “What have you been feeding Bailey? His coat is so soft and shiny now!”

I guess Astamate did the trick.

 

About the author:

Paul Tan is the owner of Bailey the Golden, our brand ambassador. Bailey started training for canine obedience competitions when he was 7 months old. He has appeared in several TV appearances, including a commercial with famed dog whisperer, Cesar Millan. Bailey is currently taking Astamate as part of his supplement diet. You may follow Bailey on Instagram: Bailey the Golden.

By Paul Tan (Owner of Bailey the Golden)

Here are some of the veggies that we feed Bailey. His home-cooked diet contains 70% protein and 30% veggies.

Asparagus

When cut into bite-sized pieces, asparagus makes a healthy veggie option because it contains vitamins K, A, B1, B2, C and E, along with folate, iron, copper, fibre, manganese and potassium. It is a superfood and low in calories.

Broccoli

I‘d like to highlight this vegetable: Broccoli florets contain isothiocyanates, which can cause mild-to-potentially severe gastric irritation in some dogs. Furthermore, broccoli stalks have been known to cause obstruction in the oesophagus.  For these reasons, we have stopped feeding Bailey broccoli. If you want to give broccoli to your furkid, allow him a portion equivalent to only 10% of the total meal. Any more could be detrimental to their health.

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are a wonderful inclusion in your furkid’s meal as they are known for their vitamins – a full suite including A, B1, B6, K and G! It is also a source of manganese, folate, fibre, and potassium.

Carrots

Carrots are an excellent low-calorie snack that is high in fibre and beta-carotene.  This orange veggie is great for your dog’s teeth when taken raw.

Celery

In addition to vitamins A, B, and C, this crunchy green snack contains the nutrients needed to promote a healthy heart and even fight cancer. Celery is also known to be a breath freshener.

Cucumbers  

Cucumbers are especially good for overweight dogs, as they hold little to no carbohydrates, fats, or oils and they can even boost energy levels. They’re loaded with vitamins B1, C, K, as well as potassium, copper, magnesium, and biotin.

Green Beans

Green beans are good for your furkids because of their omega-3 fatty acids and vitamins A, C, and K. They’re also a good source of calcium, copper, fibre, folic acid, iron, niacin, manganese, potassium, riboflavin and thiamin, as well as beta-carotene. Essentially, a superpower vegetable for your furkid.

Pumpkin

Feed your dog pumpkin to load him up on fibre, vitamin A and antioxidants! Pumpkin encourages digestive regularity (it alleviates diarrhoea AND can cure constipation) and promotes cardiovascular health. It is great for Bailey’s eyes, skin and coat, and is one of the key ingredients in Bailey’s diet.

Spinach

Spinach is a particularly good option for your dog since it helps fend off inflammatory and cardiovascular issues, even cancer. A great green vegetable choice for your furkid.

Sweet Potatoes

A great source of vitamins A, B6, C, and E, as well as calcium, iron, folate, potassium, copper, thiamine and iron. This root vegetable is a super tasty addition to any furkid’s meal. We would sometimes buy the Japanese sweet potatoes as well.

When cooking for Bailey, other than a good balance of meat and vegetables, we also include small amounts of herbs and spices such as basil, rosemary and turmeric to flavour his food. You’ll be surprised how rewarding it is to see your furkid enjoy the home-cooked meals!

 

About the author:

Paul Tan is the owner of Bailey the Golden, our brand ambassador. Bailey started training for canine obedience competitions when he was 7 months old. He has appeared in several TV appearances, including a commercial with famed dog whisperer, Cesar Millan. Bailey is currently taking Astamate as part of his supplement diet. You may follow Bailey on Instagram: Bailey the Golden.

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